Blogs

Learn, review and COMMENT on the EPA's Proposed Plan BEFORE September 6, 5pm.

1. Learn:
Click here to view the EPA Fact Sheet and summary of the Proposed Plan (8 pages, 1MB), or click here to download the full PDF version of the EPA's Portland Harbor Proposed Plan (151 pages, 23MB). Additional information and details can be found at the links on this site and at http://go.usa.gov/3Wf2B

2. Review:
The Plan is currently being reviewed by multiple organizations and individuals. As we have more material available, we will post that here. Click here to see an initial list of concerns raised by Dr. Peter deFur, technical consultant working with the Portland Harbor Community Advisory Group and Willamette Riverkeepers.

3. Comment:
You may use this form below (courtesy of http://www.cleanupportlandharbor.org/) to submit your own comment to EPA. Write your own comments in your own words highlighting what you feel are the most important points to raise. Be specific when you can.

The deadline for Public Comments is September 6.

Dear Ms. McCarthy,

The proposed cleanup of Portland Harbor is a big win for industry and a bad deal for the public. EPA’s cleanup proposal tackles just 8% of a site area that is 100% toxic. A more aggressive plan is needed to prevent even more harm to human health and the environment. On behalf of all people who rely on the river for food, recreation, employment and culture, I urge the EPA to implement a plan that:

  • Moves quickly and sustainably reduces contaminants causing harm to Willamette and Columbia river resources
  • Includes ongoing monitoring and cleanup upriver and downriver from the site
  • Contributes to healthy fish that are safe to eat for all people
  • Holds polluters accountable for creating a safer Portland Harbor
  • These elements get us closer to the plan our communities deserve.

    And I deserve a clean, safe Portland Harbor.

    City of Portland to file Suite Against Monsanto for PCBs

    The Portland City Attorney has submitted an item for Council approval to support a lawsuit against Monsanto to recover costs expended in the Superfund Cleanup of the Willamette River caused by PCBs. See http://www.portlandoregon.gov/auditor/article/568795

    Authorize the City Attorney to take legal action against Monsanto Company and its
    successor entities to recover public funds that have been and will be expended by the City
    as a result of the manufacture and distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls PCBs
    (Resolution)

    My View: Do Superfund cleanup right

    As published in the Portland Tribune
    http://pamplinmedia.com/pt/10-opinion/278561-154405-my-view-do-superfund...

    October 27, 2015
    by Travis Williams

    Citizens must be vigilant to ensure Willamette River contaminants are removed correctly

    Over many decades, a stretch of the Willamette River from the Fremont Bridge to near the Columbia River has been heavily polluted. Mixed into the river sediments over the years, contaminants such as PCBs, heavy metals, oil-based pollutants, and even the breakdown products of DDT are found in this area.

    Portland Harbor Community Café

    Thursday, July 16, 2015
    Occupy St. Johns worked with staff from the EPA to create a community discussion about the Portland Harbor Superfund Cleanup, and what people hope to see as a result of the cleanup.
    Discussion was illustrated as the meeting progressed, to gather comments and turn the discussion into a visual representation.

    February CAG Meeting

    The February 2015 CAG meeting included a presentation from EPA about Monitored Natural Recovery, including some discussion of effectiveness and appropriateness to conditions in the Portland Harbor. Attached here is the display portion of the presentation.

    Attached is also the DEQ Zidell presentation that Scott Manzano gave at the February 2015 meeting.

    Heavy rain causes sewer overflow to the Willamette River

    Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Advisory

    From Portland Bureau of Environmental Services:

    January 17, 2015 (updated 1/18/15 8:00 a.m.)
    Heavy rain causes sewer overflow to the Willamette River

    Heavy rain on Saturday, January 17, 2015 caused Portland’s combined sewer system to overflow to the Willamette River. The public should avoid contact with the river from the Sellwood Bridge downstream to the Willamette’s confluence with the Columbia River near Kelley Point Park.

    Schnitzer Steel Sustainability Report

    Schnitzer Steel has published their Sustainability Report for 2014. Read the report at http://www.schnitzersteel.com/sustainability_report.aspx

    While the report highlights efforts by the company world wide to reduce negative impacts on the environment, and emphasizes the value of recycling metal as an important factor in sustainability, it does not include any particular details about the facility on the Willamette River.

    Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Advisory

    From Portland Bureau of Environmental Services:

    CSO Advisory

    October 22, 2014
    For immediate release
    For more information contact Linc Mann, 503-823-5328
    Heavy rain causes sewer overflow to the Willamette River

    Today’s rainstorm caused Portland’s combined sewer system to overflow to the Willamette River. The public should avoid contact with Willamette River water from just south of the Sellwood Bridge downstream to the Willamette’s confluence with the Columbia River near Kelley Point Park for 48 hours after the combined sewer overflow (CSO) event ends.

    The Willamette Speaks Storytelling

    The Willamette Speaks Storytelling-November 16, Sunday-4 to 6pm-Linnton Community Center, 10614 N. St. Helens Rd. (Hwy. 30) Refreshments provided

    Habitat Restoration Underway in Portland Harbor

    This summer habitat restoration efforts are underway on the southern tip of Sauvie Island in Portland, Oregon. Alder Creek is the first habitat restoration project that will be implemented specifically to benefit fish and wildlife affected by contamination in the Portland Harbor Superfund site. The project will provide habitat for salmon, lamprey, mink, bald eagle, osprey, and other native fish and wildlife living in the area.

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